Read The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway Online

The Old Man and the Sea

The last novel Ernest Hemingway saw published, The Old Man and the Sea has proved itself to be one of the enduring works of American fiction. It is the story of an old Cuban fisherman and his supreme ordeal: a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream. Using the simple, powerful language of a fable, Hemingway takes the timeless themes of cou...

Title : The Old Man and the Sea
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The Old Man and the Sea Reviews

  • Gaurav



    The whole conviction of my life now rests upon the belief that loneliness, far from being a rare and curious phenomenon, peculiar to myself and to a few other solitary men, is the central and inevitable fact of human existence.

    -Tom Wolfe



    Loneliness of human existence is omnipresent, perhaps that is what human existence is condemned to and that is what has haunted human beings most since the early days of civilization. Though loneliness is an unavoidable condition of our humanity, it resides in
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  • Lyn

    A masterpiece.

    Like a fable, this has become a part of our cultural consciousness. Santiago's simple heroism is a benchmark for all who persevere and endure.

  • Riku Sayuj

    The wolves will come...

    I started this in high spirits as my updates show: "fifth re-read, how thrilling it is to plumb new depths in old wells of wisdom..."

    But, as I read on towards the last few pages, I couldn't shake the feeling that this is Moby Dick set in an alternate universe.

    In this alternate universe:

    The Giant Leviathan is a noble, unseen fish - steady and without malice.

    Captain Ahab is transformed into a gentle, wise old zen master. Santiago - a humble fisherman with no legendary crew t

    “They beat me, Manolin,” he said. “They truly beat me.”

    “He didn’t beat you. Not the fish.”

    “No. Truly. It was afterwards.”
    ...more

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽



    So, reading this book was my personal penance for reading a rather silly YA fantasy freebie, Obsidian. If I read something particularly shallow and brainless, I try to balance it out with a classic or something that makes me actually use my brain cells.

    At first Hemingway's typical simple, spare prose and his testosterone-fueled values were getting on my nerves. Digression here: one of the funnier things I've read was a piece on McSweeney's titled "Toto's 'Africa' by Ernest Hemingway". If you kno

    His head spun from whiskey and soda. She was a damned nice woman. It would take a lot to drag him away from her. It was unlikely that a hundred men or more could ever do such a thing. The air, now thick and moist, seemed to carry rain again. He blessed the rains of Africa. They were the only thing left to bless in this forsaken place, he thought—at least until she set foot on the continent. They were going to take some time to do the things they never had.

    He stood on the tarmac and watched as the plane came in for its landing. He heard the sound of wild dogs crying out into the night. The man thought the dogs sounded desperate, perhaps having grown restless and longing for some company. He knew the feeling.
    Anyway, I'm reading sentences in this book like "They sat on the Terrace and many of the fishermen made fun of the old man and he was not angry," and I'm thinking, I'm just going to have to make myself power through this. But gradually this story sucked me in, and I could feel the nobility in both the old man and the immense fish. I had sympathy for old Santiago and his physically and mentally excruciating battle against the marlin (view spoiler).

    The Christ imagery toward the end was interesting, if not subtle. For example:
    He started to climb again and at the top he fell and lay for some time with the mast across his shoulder. He tried to get up. But it was too difficult and he sat there with the mast on his shoulder and looked at the road.
    There's a lot more (his poor hands!), and it was moving even if I'm not completely buying everything Hemingway is selling. It's clear that the old man has gone through a shattering experience and has come through it, if not having defeated the forces of death, still with a huge personal victory.

    I'm going to digress a little here again, and get a bit personal, but I'm reminded as well of an old poem, "Gethsemane" by Ella Wheeler Wilcox, that ends:
    All paths that have been, or shall be,

    Pass somewhere through Gethsemane.

    All those who journey, soon or late,

    Must pass within the garden’s gate;

    Must kneel alone in darkness there,

    And battle with some fierce despair.

    God pity those who cannot say,

    “Not mine but thine,” who only say,

    “Let this cup pass,” and cannot see

    The purpose in Gethsemane.
    We all have our personal hardships, whether they be giant fish, sharks (I've met a few in my life, mostly human), jobs, physical problems, relationships, or any number of other trials in our lives. Not giving up, enduring with dignity, doing your best, reeling in that fish, battling those relentless sharks -- how we handle our troubles makes a huge difference, both to those around us and, perhaps mostly, to ourselves. ...more

  • Kenny

    ’But man is not made for defeat’ he said. ‘A man can be destroyed, but not defeated.’



    I first encountered Hemingway in college. I was taking a humanities class, and the professor had us read Hemingway’s The Nick Adams Stories . I fell in love with Hemingway’s short stories. I wrote an impassioned paper on the character of Nick and received an “A” for my efforts. Throughout the years, I have returned to Hemingway’s short stories, and novellas, and have never been disappointed.

    Fast forward 15
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  • Ahmad Sharabiani

    521. The Old Man and The Sea, Ernest Hemingway

    The Old Man and the Sea is a short novel written by the American author Ernest Hemingway in 1951 in Bimini, Bahamas, and published in 1952. It was the last major work of fiction by Hemingway that was published during his lifetime. One of his most famous works, it tells the story of Santiago, an aging Cuban fisherman who struggles with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream off the coast of Cuba.

    In 1953, The Old Man and the Sea was awarded the Pul
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  • Foad

    خیلى خیلى وقت پیش، زمانى كه هنوز نوجوانى بودم، داستانى نوشتم به تقلید از پیرمرد و دریاى همینگوى، ولى با لحنى به مقتضاى سنم، رمانتیك و شاعرانه. داستان ماجراى پیرمردى ست كه از این كه سیرى و گرسنگى خود و خانواده اش به دست بازى هاى دریا باشد، به تنگ آمده. روزى، پس از چهار ماه بدون صید ماندن، چهار ماه گرسنگى، تورش را بر مى دارد و مى رود تا صید اصلى را به تور بیندازد. نه ماهى هاى كوچك، نه نهنگ هاى بزرگ، خود خود دریا را.

    خانواده اش از این جنون به وحشت مى افتند و مى خواهند متوقفش كنند، مى گویند: اراده ى
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  • Luís C.

    My first Hemingway, that I had looked forward to seeing! And positive results, with a very good read, carried around Santiago, an old Cuban fisherman who has caught further fish for eighty seven days, and decided the next day to attempt once more to conquer the ocean.And from there, we follow three days of struggle, fury and battle the old man facing a huge fish, sturgeon; it finally so close to this human, that will express the same feelings and that will eventually move the fisherman. Finally, ...more