Read The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood Online

The Handmaid's Tale

Offred is a Handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. She may leave the home of the Commander and his wife once a day to walk to food markets whose signs are now pictures instead of words because women are no longer allowed to read. She must lie on her back once a month and pray that the Commander makes her pregnant, because in an age of declining births, Offred and the other Hand...

Title : The Handmaid's Tale
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Number of Pages : 311 pages
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The Handmaid's Tale Reviews

  • Stephanie *Very Stable Genius*

    7/7/17 I'm just going to leave this here.... fuck Paul Ryan.... but not literally, ew.

    Sleeveless women? My stars and garters!

    03/31/17. So, this Russia thing.... Am I right?

    2/5/17.....just another giant step towards making this book a reality, like they always dreamed of.

    Original review written in 2o12:

    WARNING: This review is being written after I worked a 13 hour day, with another one on the horizon tomorrow, and a glass of wine and while watching the Rachel Maddow show. Current events have put
    ...more

  • Adina

    I. Night

    I am lying awake in my bed. I keep my eyes closed and beg sleep to come. Fruitlessly! Outside, the rain is whipping the windows without mercy. My husband is sleeping next to me, oblivious to my struggle. I need my thoughts to go away. I need to forget that I just finished the Handmaid's Tale and its effect on me. I knew I should have resumed myself to the self-imposed daily quota of 10%. But no. I had to read the last 30 % in one go and now I can't sleep because of it. It’s like a shot o
    ...more

  • Nathan

    The Handmaid's Tale portrays a terrifying but very real and possible dystopia. At first, it's difficult to tell what exactly is going on in the handmaid's world, although her spare narration is filled with a deep sense of fear and danger. It's challenging but exciting to try to make sense of all the frightening details that she describes, and that's one of the things that made this such a compelling read for me--I was desperate to figure out what was happening as well as how and why things had g ...more

  • Elizabeth Sagan

    If 1984 is the father, The Handmaid’s Tale is the mother. They are both in the same category and yet they are different. The Handmaid’s Tale is more... feminine. It revolves around Offred’s drama, unlike 1984, which revolves more around the ideology (more like a battle between Winston’s ideas and O’Brien’s ideas).

    *

    I’ve read it with the shittiest combination of rage, sadness, fear and paranoia, which stuck with me throughout the entire book. I don’t easily get this emotional. But let me tell you
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  • Navessa

    I would love to write a lengthy review for this book. But I can't. Because I'm so emotionally drained after reading it that it's a miracle I'm not still hiding underneath a pile of blankets, sobbing.

    This is by no means an easy read, but I think it's a book that everyone needs to read.

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  • Dan Schwent

    In the near future, the rights of women have been stripped away and the fertile ones become Handmaids and are assigned to upper class men. Offred remembers the time before and knows there must be a way out of the hell men have created...

    Once upon a time, I dated a woman whose favorite writer was Margaret Atwood and she passed along this book for me to read. Frankly, I was pretty impressed with the dystopian tale but found it a little far-fetched at the time. Now, in the later part of 2017, it fe
    ...more

  • Jennifer

    (edited from a paper I wrote in college about the book)

    In 1986, when Margaret Atwood published The Handmaid’s Tale, Ronald Regan had declared “Morning in America,” and society was going to renew itself by returning to the old values. The Christian right, in its infancy at the time, was rising in reaction to the Free Love, and the horrors of AIDs. The 1984 election gave us Willie Horton, and a reminder about how violent and evil society had become. Finally, even though Chernobyl happened shortly
    ...more

  • Miranda Reads

    We were the people who were not in the papers. We lived in the blank white spaces at the edges of print. It gave us more freedom. We lived in the gaps between the stories.
    Set in the not-so-distant future, Offred is designated as a Handmaid. Meaning her fertile womb "allows" her to stay in the house of Fred as his legal consort.

    (Hence the name "Of Fred" and the not-so-subtle foreshadowing "offered".)

    Her alternative? Working in the radioactive wastelands (which would undoubtedly lead to her de ...more